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20121121
20121129
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KRCB (PBS) 15
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English 15
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Nov 25, 2012 10:00am PST
translation and his own commentaries on jewish law have made the talmud more accessible to non-scholars. bob abernethy reports. >> we have a profile today of one of the most respected rabbis in the world. the devout come to the wall to pray, and so do many 13-year-old boys at the time of their bar mitzvahs, when they take on the full responsibilities of adults. one of those duties is studying the torah, with its 613 laws about how to live. the torah, for rabbi steinsaltz, is a divine guide, a map of the paths and the main road through a world of danger and blessings, in his words, lions and angels. >> we are living in a world we really don't know what are the paths. we don't know what are the ways. we don't even know what the main road is. so we need some kinds of signs to tell us that here live lions, and here possibly live angels. that's mostly what the torah is, a book basically of instructions -- go this way, go the other way, do it, don't do it. so that's as simple as that. >> holy as the torah is, its laws are in some ways unclear. for instance, it requires keeping the sabbath, but it
PBS
Nov 25, 2012 9:00am PST
. >> i think you have to talk about whether it's by law or by culture. and i think most evebody would have understood early on that by law, the nation was secular, but by choice, the nation was -- in other words, its people were christians and there's always been that dynamic, people have always understood there's a tension there between a population that's largely christian but uses its freedom to choose christiity and the laws that say go ahead ande whatever religion you want to be. >> this is what i understand from your text. one of five of the founding fathers had any religious stressed denomination or affiliation and that was when it existed calvinist and that was pretty much of a god almost independent of jesus, correct, a watch maker god who starts the earth and then he leaves it on its own, a deistic god? >> well, no, in terms of the population there's the calvinists and the deists. >> way back then? >> right. the calvinists totally predominated among the population. the founding fathers were much more elites and yes, many of them were deists but in terms of the vast majority
PBS
Nov 20, 2012 5:30pm PST
take to keep this damage from happening again. >> brown: ray suarez updates the health care reform law, as the obama administration issues new rules governing what insurers must cover. >> woodruff: and we close under the bright lights of high school football, where a trail-blazing coach puts her players' studies ahead of practice. >> you won't be playing football. we like to think we have a lot of life to live so you will too and you need to prepare for that. football is kind of just icing on the >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: this was a day of urgent diplomacy aimed at stopping the battle of air strikes and roc
PBS
Nov 27, 2012 5:30pm PST
to the system do you think are required? how deep? >> please understand that current law, the president's law right now, the law of the land, makes it so that medicare, medicaid and social security all are on a road to insolvency. that's the current law. we believe that those three programs, medicaid, medicare and social security need to be saved and strengthened and secured. through our budget proposal we've had out the last two years we have put forward a proposal that actually makes it so that current retirees, current medicare recipients see no change whatsoever but in fact we save and secure the program for future generations. that the medicaid program which again is on a path to insolvency and states are complaining vociferously about this that we actually save that program from a financial standpoi. there are wonderful proposals on the table about solving and saving social security. you can't address the spending issues without fundamental really form and real solutions for medicare, medicaid and social security. >> brown: just to stay with you, won't those be unpopular? after this ele
PBS
Nov 22, 2012 5:00pm PST
, but with that growth comes a higher cost of living. demonstrators carried signs on the 2011 law requiring salary reductions to cover social security and health benefits. the law is expected to go into effect in 2014. but workers say those costs should remain the government's responsibility. similar protests have been recently held in other cities around the country as workers urge the government to protect them. one of the world's most famous traveled denations. now the idyllic island on southern thailand has plans to lure a growing segment of the mark. thpredinantly buddhist country makes up nearly 25% of the world's population. here's the report. >> seeking sand and thailand's famous hospitality. they include rising numbers of muslim too. from the middle east, india and other parts of southeast asia. one of the annual events shows what the island has to offer muslim guests. visiting the fair, threw his weight behind the plan. >> if we want to cater for all sorts of clients and tourists, we need to be sensitive to their demands. muslims when they travel. with that in mind, halal means permissib
PBS
Nov 26, 2012 4:30pm PST
of the regulations in dodd- frank financial reform. about a quarter of the law's new rules from s.e.c. remain incomplete. though critics say she wasn't forceful enough against wall street executives, president obama today praised her leadership. saying quote, "...the s.e.c. is stronger and our financial system is safer and better able to serve the american people-- thanks in large part to mary's hard work." >> reporter: the president's chice to replace shapiro, elisse walter would finish the 13 months left on the current term as chairman. walter served as interim chairman before shapiro took over. the administration has until next december to nominate a new chairman for a full term. sylvia hall, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: joining us now with more on the s.e.c., john coffee, securities law professor at columbia university. you know, jack, mary schapiro got lots of criticism for her years at the sec, whether you want to talk about lax supervision for the whole persony maddoff scandal, she gets criticized for it. as she leaves the sec what kind of shape is that agency in? >> well, i think i
PBS
Nov 22, 2012 5:30pm PST
greece to actually change its laws so private creditors could no longer sue to collect if enough other creditors, like the e.c.b., also owned greek debt. could that serve as model for other countries? well, once you start changing laws, says hans humes, the sky's the limit. >> right now, we're teetering on something that's far worse than what we saw in latin america. >> reporter: in the 1980s or '90s you mean. >> yeah, i mean i lived in latin america, i saw it and i was part of the workout. this is worse. >> reporter: does lee buchheit then... >> have a lot of work? ( laughter ) >> reporter: yeah, i'm sure he has a lot of work, but does he bear a lot of the blame? >> no, no. i mean he's just reacting to the situation that's evolving. but i think there's a lot of concern that, if you have this legal coaching on how to really gut creditor rights, that you may actually end up in a situion ere nobodyantsto lend to countries. >> reporter: but if that's already a clear and present danger, we wondered why not just stiff the creditors? after all the history of sovereign debt is default, defaul
PBS
Nov 26, 2012 5:30pm PST
vii of the civil rights act, which as you know is our antidiscrimination law. under. the supervisors is imbued with the employer's authority. an employer can be held liable if a nonsupervisor employee harasses another employee. but it's tougher to prove. you have to shout employer knew or should have known about the harassment and failed to act. maida vance brought this lawsuit against ball state univsity. she's an african american woman working in the dining services division of the university, claimed she was harassed by a white coworker, was slapped on the head, blocked at the elevator, racial epithets were used such as "sambo" and "buckwheat" in her presence. she complained and finally brought her lawsuit against the university. she lost in the lower courts. the lower court, federal appellate court, said this coworker was not a supervisor, and took the definition that is probably the most restricti-- that is, the supervisor has to be somebody who can make a tangible employment decision, such as hiring and firing. >> brown: today it made its way to the supreme court, and her lawye
PBS
Nov 21, 2012 4:30pm PST
are a key part of the health insurance reform law's efforts to expand the number of americans with coverage. we spoke with the head of the largest health insurer in florida, blue cross blue shield. patrick geraghty is the chairman and c.e.o. of florida blue. >> tom: pat, thank you for joining us tonight. will blue cross, blue shield participate if there is a health exchange in the state of florida? >> we absolutely will. we will position our company to be part of any distribution channel that is out there. >> tom: how has enrollment been? >> enrollment -- it's not in the exchange yet, but enrollment in our company, we're over83,000 new members this year, and we've got over 60,000 new members sold for 1/1/13. >> tom: how many of those new members have existing health insurance. how many are moving from uninsured to insured. >> almost all of those members have health insurance right now. we haven't seen the big movement from uninsured to insured happening yet. >> tom: in the past three years, florida has been number three in the united states, among states with the number of uninsured residen
PBS
Nov 22, 2012 4:30pm PST
to cut in red ink next year, 80% of it comes in the form of higher taxes. under current law, 20% comes from lowering government spending. this is just the first step as part of a $7 trillion effort to cut the debt over the next decade. that has led some to describe what could be coming as a fiscal slope, not a cliff. whatever geological description you prefer, it is on the map for every american. >> susie: a critical issue in this fiscal cliff debate: jobs. if the government cuts spending and rais taxes all at once on january 1, the economy will lose 2.5 million job sylvia hall reports. >> reporter: in this baltimore lab, dr. curt civin researches leukemia in search of a cure. it's hardly a political job, but these days he's keeping a close eye on the federal budget. you see, the sequester-- the severe spending cuts headed our way in january-- could affect him. if it takes affect, it will cut an estimated $2.5 billion from the national institutes of health. dr. civin and researchers like him depend on grants from the institutes for funding. >> it's tough enough to cure cancer. tough ba
PBS
Nov 21, 2012 11:00pm PST
care. i'm going to transform government. i'm going to transform law." or in this case "i'm going to transform marketing." so we have the chance of performing the kind of innovation and software development that we've gotten good at in the computer industry for computer applications and applying much more broadly. this is a big change in the computer industry itself and this is a very big change in many industries that are being -- essentially effected or transformed. retail is a big one. right now in the process of -- software is eating retail and marketing is right for it and there's a huge progress in software base marketing in the last 20 years. but there's another big innovation that is right to happen right now. which is marketing becoming a software becoming enabled and powered through applications. >> so what would you most like mark? i'll begin with you. people in this audience who come here marketing as advertising geniuses to understand about the revolution that you know a whole lot about? what is your take away from what you have to say? >> i think it's -- we're on the
PBS
Nov 21, 2012 5:30pm PST
, more than $300 million was spent by groups not required by law to disclose their donors. for more on where all that money went, what it bought, and what it means for future elections we turn to two reporters who've been tracking those numbers: matea gold of "the los angeles times." and eliza newlin carney, who covers this for "roll call" newspaper. and we thank you both for being with us. matea gold, let me start with you. most expensive election in history. how did that manifest itself? >> well, i think there's no question money played a remarkable and prominent role in this campaign in a way we haven't seen in recent years. this was the first presidential campaigns since a series of important federal government decisions, including the supreme court's decision in citizenses united that opened the door to more outside spending. that's what drove us to the record $6 billion spending you mentioned. outside groups played this enormous role, both pummeling the airwaves with ads from the predentl campaigns and nate and house races. i think there's no question they made the tenor of al
PBS
Nov 23, 2012 5:30pm PST
on egyptian constitutional law and politics. he's a professor at george washington university. do you find it significant that this wasn't just tahrir square but alexandria, port said. >> oh, yes. essentially most of the non-islammist political forces in egypt-- that is the brotherhood and others aside-- have lined up against us. the real question is are they going to be able to form a united front? and do they have any strategy by which to overturn morsi's decisions. >> suarez: what exactly has he done through these decrees? what did he say-- what powers did he give to himself, basically, until there's a constitution? >> well, he did a lot of little things. he dismissed the old prosecutor, seen as a hold-over from the old rejewel. he promised new trials. but the main thing that he did was to take all of his actions, and place them outside of court review. and he also made impossible to disband the constitutional assembly that is now writing the document. he had already assumed not simply presidential powers but legislative powers. that he did in august. what he is doing right now what, he
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)